CTO advocates automated tests and continuous delivery

Automated testing and continuous development have become the driving force for CTO Andy Piper as Push Technology evolves its middleware platform.

Andy Piper is CTO at London-based Push Technology, which provides a Java-based middleware platform that helps U.K. developers working on applications that require a lot of messaging to a lot of users. Most of their clients publish statistical information for either financial entities (like stocks and bonds) or for online gambling. Piper has pushed his development team forward by espousing continuous delivery and automated testing.

When it comes to functional testing, Piper says everything has to be automated. “Manual tests are almost valueless,” he said. Manual tests take too much time, and he said he needs tests that are quick, clear and repeatable. Those requirements naturally lead to automated tests. He also pointed out that there’s practically zero user interface to a middleware platform, which removes a lot of the need for user experience testing.

Conducting performance tests is one area where Piper sees benefits to manual testing. He pointed to Gil Tene’s research on latency at Azul and explained that for performance testing, he’s not looking for average behavior; he’s analyzing the effect of the outliers. He said that using tools like HdrHistogram and jHiccup and analyzing the results intuitively works better for his team than trying to set up reliable automated performance tests.

Piper said the important aspects of functional testing are maintaining quality and moving quickly. “It’s about enabling the developers to make changes more confidently,” he said, “so they work more efficiently.” Automation is an important part of keeping up with the pace at which his developers are able to make changes and making sure they get the feedback they need as soon as possible. But managing a large battery of automated tests can be challenging.

Some tests break bad

Most of the tests are very straightforward, according to Piper; they either pass or fail and the results are very accurate. However, some tests have a tendency to fail when they should pass — or they fail for the wrong reason. He calls these tests Heisentests, after the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. These tests are “a bit of a bugbear” for Piper right now.

The Heisentests are tricky because they can’t be trusted. A failed result may be accurate and require a developer to recheck the work and fix something. Or a failed result might mean that some detail is slightly different than expected and everything is actually working as it should. Developers don’t appreciate being sent on a wild goose chase, especially when the supposed target is an imaginary flaw in their code.

The Heisentests are a problem that persists at Push Technology for the same reason that technical debt persists at many organizations: There aren’t enough staff hours to fix the misfiring tests and meet project deadlines. However, the problem has reached a point where it must be addressed, and Piper is starting by having his team sort out the good tests from the bad. He said he has some testers working to sort the tests using JUnit categories. This way his developers will know which tests to question right away, and the team will know which tests to overhaul when they have time to pay down the technical debt.

Continuously delivering value

The search for efficiency has led Push Technology to adopt continuous delivery practices. Piper said they use Maven for source code and Jenkinsfor automation, which seems to be a popular combination. Right now, every change that his team commits is automatically merged into a new shippable version of the platform as soon as it passes the battery of automated tests.

Piper deliberately chose continuous delivery over continuous deploymentbecause “enterprise clients want to peg everything to particular releases.” It’s important for enterprise developers to update middleware at their own pace and to be able to rely on the platform to remain stable.

Push Technology is working on a cloud release that will likely be aimed at midsize businesses. That version “will probably be more of a continuous deployment model,” Piper said. He said that one of the challenges of moving to continuous development will be making sure all the code that goes into production is as hardened as it should be. “I love all my developers to death,” he said, “But I’d still feel like I was being irresponsible if I don’t keep a close eye on them.”

Source: TechTarget-CTO advocates automated tests and continuous delivery by James Denman

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