The Future of Robotic Process Automation

Artificial intelligence. Is there any term that’s more used in tech these days or that has a wider range of meanings? Any one that conjures up more excitement, hyperbole and fear? In this episode Jon Prial talks with Adam Devine, the CMO of WorkFusion, one of Georgian Partners’ newest portfolio companies, about a very practical application of the technology: Using AI to improve and even automate what have traditionally been human-driven processes in the workplace. You’ll hear about robotic process automation, an emerging field that is bringing AI-powered software robots into the workplace to help make companies more efficient and effective.

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Transcript:

Jon Prial: Artificial intelligence. Is there any term that’s more used in tech these days or that has a wider range of meanings? Is there any one that conjures up more excitement, hyperbole and fear? Today, we’re going to focus on a very practical and a real application of this technology, using AI to improve and automate what have traditionally been human-driven processes.

We’ll take a journey, looking at how technology has evolved to help automate the work of traditional back-office business processes. The latest step in the evolution has been the development of robotic process automation, an emerging field that’s bringing AI-powered software robots into the workplace to help make companies more efficient and effective.

We’ll find out how on today’s episode, when I talk to my guest, Adam Devine, head of marketing at WorkFusion. WorkFusion is one of the newest members to our portfolio, and it’s using AI to help large companies use intelligent automation to work more efficiently.

I’m Jon Prial, and welcome to the Impact Podcast.

[music ends]

Jon: At one point, I was looking at a survey. I’m not sure if it was on your website or something I found, but McKinsey had said that 49 percent of the activities that people are doing today in the global economy can be automated with a currently demonstrated technology. Can you take me through your view of what you think of when you think of automation?

Adam Devine: Sure. First, I would invite everyone listening to close their eyes and imagine the huge expanse of a back office of a large financial institution or insurance company. Hundreds if not thousands of super-smart, capable people spending 30, 40, 50, 60 percent of their day doing things like operating the UIs of SAP or Oracle, super-repetitive swivel chair work, or looking at a PDF on one monitor and an Excel sheet on another monitor and simply, routinely transferring the information from that PDF, which you can’t manipulate, to an Excel sheet.

I think McKinsey is very much right. There’s a high percentage of work that the average so-called knowledge worker, people who work with information all day long, can be automated.

Jon: The thought of taking the data from the PDF to the Excel spreadsheet has to get codified somewhere. How do you approach that in terms of that’s something that could be done more efficiently, that needs to be automated?

How do you figure that out? How do you get the algorithms behind all these changes, perhaps?

Adam: There is this notion of writing rules or having rules learned. In the old days, like two years ago, there was scripting — if/then/else automation. You’d have teams of engineers and maybe some data scientists writing rules for scripts to follow, and that meant, as you say, codifying each and every action that a machine would take so that there is absolutely no ambiguity about how the work is done.

This, today, is an old-fashioned way of automating a process. What we can do today with machine learning — and it’s not just our business, this is a growing trend — is having machines that learn. Learn is the key word.

Rather than writing the rules, people do as they do. They open up an Excel sheet. They open up a document. They click here. They click there, and over the course of time, machines can detect patterns that people can’t. This is what I mean by learning. Where someone clicks on a document once it’s been digitized, what the context is of that information.

With enough repetition — typically 400, 500 repetitions — the software is able to identify a pattern and train an algorithm to do what a person had been doing.

Jon: I started, one of my early careers we did a lot in the world of workflow and image processing, taking electronic versions of paper and moving it through a process, maybe reading the paper, managing workflow. That evolved from paper-based processes to human-based processes.

Can you talk to me more, then, about robotic process automation, what that market is and what it was a few years ago and what it’s evolving to?

Adam: Sure. If workflow yesterday was the movement of paper, the movement of information, RPA is one level above that, or one step up the ladder, in that it doesn’t just move the information, it can transform it and transfer it. A good example would be moving structured information from SAP to Oracle or from Oracle to Workday.

These are systems that don’t inherently talk to one another. They’re different formats, and they require what you’d call human handoffs between these applications. RPA can operate these systems at either a UI level, meaning at a virtual desktop a bot will enter credentials automagically and run an operation to do a transaction or to move the information, or it can operate at an API level where — I guess you could call it— diplomatic code serves as an intermediary between these two applications.

I would say that RPA is the next level up above old‑fashioned BPM or workflow.

Jon: Does that involve AI, or does AI then come to the next level?

Adam: It can involve AI. One of the problems with scripting and with RPA is exceptions. What happens when something changes about the process or the content and the bot, which has been programmed to do a very defined task, says I don’t know how to do this? That means the process breaks. That means the bot breaks.

What happens, with just RPA, is that a person discovers that a bot has broken, because the business process has failed, and has to go in and manually retrain that bot and fix the business process. When you add AI to RPA, you have automated exceptions handling. You have an intelligent agent identify that the bot doesn’t know what to do and route that work to a person.

The person handles the change if the bot can’t figure it out, and that creates a contribution to the knowledge base. It teaches the bot what has gone wrong so that the same mistake or a similar mistake doesn’t happen in the future. What AI does for RPA is business continuity.

Jon: When you talk about RPA getting improved by managing the exceptions, and you’re managing the exceptions because you’re learning things — it’s a learning opportunity. Obviously, you’re learning from data. What new type of data is being brought in to a system to allow that learning to take place?

Adam: There is a lot of new learning that takes place when AI assists RPA. One of the more interesting things is workforce analytics. Rather than having opacity around who your best human performers are, around what their capacity is, what their capability is, what their aptitude is, when AI gets involved and can monitor the actions of a person that’s intervening in a process, you very quickly figure out who your star performers are and what they’re good at. You very quickly have transparency on what the capacity is of a workforce and how work should be routed.

A good example would be the back offices of a large bank. Most offices are highly distributed across Latin America and India and the US and Europe, so when workforce A in Costa Rica blows out of capacity or doesn’t have the capability, AI can look at that workforce and say, “OK, I’m going to move this task, this business process, to a supplementary workforce in the Philippines or in Omaha.”

The number one set of data you get when AI is involved in a business process is not just the automation of the work, but an understanding of how people are performing it and how best to perform the work in the future.

Jon: As you get started, as you do an implementation, I assume the first focus area is how to make a process better and focus on that data. I know you even do some crowdsourcing of data around that. Let’s talk about making a process better, and then we’ll take a step back and do a little more about the people.

Adam: We get this question a lot, about how our software enables transformation. I was talking to an executive from a shared services organization just yesterday at a big conference down in Orlando, and I used the word transformation, and he flinched. Apparently, transformation is a four-letter word in a lot of these big organizations.

They’re not necessarily trying to transform. They are truly trying to automate. What we see is that by using software such as ours, there needn’t be a focus on transformation for the sake of transformation. When you allow an intelligent automation to do its thing by automating — for example, import payments in trade finance, or claims processing in insurance — the byproduct of automating that work, by letting algorithms see how data is handled, see what the sources are, see how people extract and categorize and remediate information and thus automate it, the process, the byproduct of this automation is transformation. Does that make sense?

Jon: The transformation, it still involves automation. I’m talking about the conflict you had with the customer you were talking to. Doesn’t that transformation get them to automation, or not? I’m trying to think what the end goal might be here. They’re not mutually exclusive, are they?

Adam: They’re definitely not mutually exclusive. Most businesses simply have a remit to either cut costs or improve service and capacity. It’s one of those two things, and in these days, it’s both. Most shared services, product lines, operations, wherever the genesis of automation is, wherever the genesis of these initiatives are, they’re starting with their KPIs.

Their KPIs are not impacted by simply transforming work. Their KPIs are impacted by eliminating the amount of manual work done in the operation. That elimination of manual work and the freeing up of human intelligence to focus on higher-value work is, in effect, transformation.

Jon: The results, you’re looking at the KPIs and you’re getting better business results, then everybody should be happy, because the topline numbers matter the most.

Adam: Exactly.

Jon: In terms of industry, you’re mostly in fintech, but what do you see is the opportunities for the automation of these types of processes against different industries? What’s your take on that?

Adam: That’s a great question. Martin Ford, who’s the author of “Rise of the Robots” — we’re actually featured prominently in that book — super-smart guy, true futurist, he spoke at this conference I was at yesterday in Orlando, the Shared Services and Outsourcing Week, and he said that to ask what the impact of AI will be on different industries would be like asking the impact of electricity on different industries.

His perspective, and I share it, is that AI will have a ubiquitous impact across every industry. It’s going to touch everything that we do. We’re not going to feel it until it’s ubiquitous and we stand back and say, wow, it really has transformed everything.

To drill into it specifically, we at WorkFusion have made a strategic choice to focus on banking, financial services, and insurance. We’re now getting into health care very quickly. We have a lot of interest from utilities, from telecom. I don’t think there’s any one industry that we won’t touch. It’s just a question of sequence, and it’s also a question of internal drive.

Banking and financial services, because of regulatory compliance, have had an unusually high amount of pressure to digitize, to automate. I think health care is very closely behind, and then the general Fortune 1000, I don’t think there’s been quite as much pressure, but some of the things that’s happening with the optics of offshoring and outsourcing will probably catalyze automation efforts even faster.

Jon: Let’s talk a little bit about the analytics. A lot of it’s rooted in basic machine learning. There are semantical challenges sometimes for people understanding the difference. I see a lot of you saying this is AI, and it’s really just machine learning. Give us your thoughts on how a technology like machine learning can evolve into something a little richer in terms of a solution set with AI.

Adam: As I understand it, machine learning is really the only practical application of what we refer to as artificial intelligence right now — algorithms that take in massive amounts of data and are configured, the feature sets are programmed to do something like extract data from an invoice.

Another subset of that question is what’s the difference between analytics and AI. A lot of businesses, as they get into their AI journey, confuse the two. Machine learning automates the manual work in business processes. Analytics, that may or may not be powered by AI, tells you something about the way a business is performing. These are two very different things.

Automation replaces manual effort. Analytics tells you something about the way things are happening. That’s the simplest definition I could give.

Jon: You earlier mentioned about training. What’s your approach to training and making sure you’re learning the best algorithms, you’re actually codifying the right actions — avoiding biases, avoiding codifying bad behaviors. What’s your approach to training?

Adam: There are two things to remember about how intelligent automation and machine learning learns to do the work of people and automates the work of people. The first problem is how do you get lots and lots of good quality data. This was a problem that we solved back in 2010 at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, which is where the company was born.

The researchers back then used the same approach to identify human quality that banks use to identify fraud in financial transactions, and that’s called outlier detection. If there are 100 workers doing a specific task and 90 of them are performing the same keystrokes, the same speed, on the same content, but 5 of them are going really fast and using only numeric characters, whereas the vast majority are using alphanumeric, and 5 of them are going really slow and using just alpha, then that means those 10 on other end are outliers, and that means that they get an increased level of scrutiny.

Maybe there is adjudication between two workers where two workers do the same thing and the results are compared. That first problem of how do you get quality data was solved by using machines to perform outlier detection and statistical quality control on workers, the same way that assembly lines ensure quality.

The second challenge is how do you take that quality data and train machine learning models. In the old days, you’d need data scientists and engineers to perform countless experiments on Markov models, traditional random fields, deep learning neural nets, and run all of this sequentially to figure out which model and which combination of models and features was going to best perform relative to human quality.

We solved that second problem about three or four years ago, which was to do with software what data scientists had done. We call it the virtual data scientist, where once the good-quality data is generated, the software automatically performs experiments with different models and feature sets and then compares them all in real time.

Once confidence is high enough, that means there’s been a winning algorithm. You can think of it like an algorithm beauty pageant where they’re all competing to do the best work and the software chooses the best model to deploy as automation.

Jon: Does this go across both broad processes, long-running processes across a day or multiple days, as well as some of the small micro tasks that individuals might do? What’s the difference?

Adam: The question is around what’s the level of granularity and application of this process of learning and training. It happens at an individual worker level in a matter of seconds, where maybe a worker handles a task and that makes a small adjustment to the way an algorithm performs, and it happens across entire lines of business where the data generated by hundreds of workers impacts the way automation performs.

That’s the beauty of machine learning is that it isn’t a blunt object. It’s an incredibly specific and — I guess you could say — perceptive capability in that the slightest adjustment by a person can change the way a machine performs.

Adam: You really are sourcing the logic from the data that you’re collecting across multiple companies, individual companies? What’s your view of data rights and learning and normalizing and learning from different companies together?

Adam: Jon, this could be a whole other podcast. We get this question a lot from our customers. Dealing with some of the most data-rigid security concerns, compliance-ridden businesses in the world in these giant banks, one of the very first questions we get from C-level stakeholders is, what are you doing with my data, and do I own it?

There are a couple of different answers within that question. The first is that our customers own their data. You could think of us as a car wash, the car being the data. The data comes into our business, into our software. It is manipulated. It is improved. It is stored into a place in a customer environment, and we no longer touch it. Our software does not store our customers’ data.

The second part of that question is do our algorithms retain the intelligence created by one customer, and can we take the intelligence from one customer and apply it to the next? There is some level of retention, but if, for example, we’re talking about something like KYC — know your customer in banking — we do not and will not take the insights generated by one customer’s very specific, proprietary business process and apply it to another customer’s.

We consider that proprietary to the customer. Would it be nice if we were like Google and my search history could be applied to your search history to improve the search results for all of mankind? Sure, but that’s not what our customers want.

Jon: You mentioned that you might change into other industries over time and grow. Absolutely that makes sense in fintech and potentially in health care, although perhaps learning about how health care procedures work across different hospitals and different solutions they may be willing to share some of the data rights and allow you to aggregate.

Today, the answer is here you are today within fintech. Could that change in other industries?

Adam: It really could, even within fintech. There’s another process called anti-money laundering, and this is essentially massive-scale fraud detection for banks. Banks don’t really consider the way they execute compliance a competitive differentiator.

There is a stream of thought among our customers to pool their intellectual resources on our software to create a ubiquitous software utility to solve non-differentiating processes like anti-money laundering, like KYC to an extent, like CCAR and BCBS 239. There are 80,000 regulations out there or something like that.

Industries and our customers, we may be a forum for them to decide where they want to compete and where they want to collaborate. In healthcare, this is particularly true, given that it is outcome-based. There’s actually a really cool company in San Francisco called Kalix Health, and they have the remit to democratize outcome based on democratizing good-quality data.

I think we’re going to see a big trend in healthcare to do more sharing than siloing.

Jon: Let’s put some CEO hats on as we get toward the end of this thing and think about CEOs. I’m going to make the assumption, the mental leap, that they have already figured out what we’ve been calling applied analytics. They’ve got analytics. They’re beginning to inject insights into processes, but they haven’t really taken the next step yet, in terms of degrees of automation and efficiencies that they could get.

They’ve got better outcomes, but they really haven’t thought about where these efficiencies are. If you’re talking to a CEO and talk about the managing and improving of processes and leveraging of the AI, where would you have the CEO start? Where should he or she start?

Adam: There’s a strategic answer and a tactical answer. Sometimes the tactical one is more insightful. In terms of the geography of a business, we see a lot of companies beginning in what’s called shared services, where there is a large aggregated workforce that serves as an internal service provider to the business, like handling processes like employee onboarding or accounts payable, the high-volume, common processes that different lines of business all employ.

Shared service is a great place to start, because it’s where outsourcing typically happens, and where there is outsourcing or offshoring, there is a large amount of work that can be automated. I would say, tactically, I would say CEOs should look toward their global business services or shared services to start their automation journey.

Strategically, I think every business needs to decide, do I want to do the same with less, or do I want to do more with the same, or do I want to be extreme and do even more with fewer? That’s the existential question of a business. If a business is healthy, they’re going to want to continue to grow their headcount but then exponentially grow their productivity.

That is the power of our software, of other software like it, that can do with machines what had been done before with people. The other thing, too, is how do you elevate the application of human intelligence? You do that by automation. You hire the same great people, but you expect them to perform at a higher level because machines are doing for them what they had done before with their hands and their minds.

Jon: As I’m building my team and I’m thinking about this and I’m going to embrace this model of being more efficient, you mentioned that you deliver a virtual data scientist. How much do you look for your customers to help, in terms of them owning and building a data science team? What are you looking for these companies to provide as they get started?

Companies are going to embrace this. These aren’t necessarily your customers, but customers are going to embrace AI. We’ve talked about data quite a bit. It does get rooted in that. What kind of skills should they be looking for?

Adam: The honest answer is that the only skills that a business truly needs to be effective with WorkFusion are subject matter experts on the process — people who understand the progression of work. Any big, successful company is going to have people within the organization that understand the methodical flow of work — first do this, then do that.

The problem with AI in the past, and actually some other vendors that are out there, is that they’re black boxes, and these black boxes require data scientists and engineers to build — you could say to fill the gap between the black box and the practical business process.

The reason why WorkFusion has been so successful and why we’re going to be such a big, important company to C-level executives across all industry is that there is no need for them to fill the gap between our capabilities and the practical business process, because we are rooted in the practical business process, and we do not require teams and teams of data scientists and engineers.

Sure, if you’re a power user and you want to radically automate across an entire business, you’re going to need some level of technical capability. You’re going to need some java engineers. IT is certainly going to need to provision environments just like they do with any software, but the beauty of this next generation of practical machine learning powered software is that it can do the dirty, highly complex work of teams of data scientists automatically.

Jon: I like the thought of making sure the CEOs stay focused on what they do well — know their business process. Stay in your swim lane. Keep going and the application of AI might get you into deeper water, but you’ll keep going. That’s the key.

Adam: That’s the key. There is the D word — disruption. I don’t see this as a disruption to the way a business works. I think a disruption would be expecting a business to go out and hire 500 data scientists and use some magical black box that has no transparency. That’s disruptive.

What is non-disruptive, what is purely evolutionary but exponential in its benefit, is a software that can seamlessly integrate into the way a business is doing their processes now and make those processes slicker and faster and more automated. That’s what every CEO wants.

[background music]

Jon: I can’t think of a better way to end it than that. That’s a perfect message. Adam, thank you so much for being with us today.

Adam: Jon, my pleasure. Thank you.

Source: georgianpartners.com-The Future of Robotic Process Automation

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AI: What it Can Bring and How to Prepare for the Future

Every decade a major disruption has occurred that altered the digital landscape: from the PC revolution, to the internet boom, to the mobile-first rise. Each development brought powerful opportunities for businesses that were smart enough to change. So what is next? The artificial intelligence (AI) boom is upon us and technology driving AI is becoming more accessible and affordable for businesses, opening doors for new use cases and workforce augmentation.

By the year 2020, if you aren’t AI-first, it will be too late, much as it was for any business that failed to make the leap to digital in decades past. Organizations have a brief window to experiment and become familiar with the strategies and technologies to get ready for the AI-first world. The emerging AI-first era is already creating new ways for organizations to interact with, serve, and empower customers and employees. For example, by augmenting employees’ capabilities using AI-specifically across intelligent automation, Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and physical automation-organizations will enable workers to achieve far more, faster, with intelligent action and better results.

Additionally, as cloud, big data, and mobile continue to converge, AI-driven user interfaces will lead to ever-deeper, more meaningful interactions-a “situational centricity” tailored not only to each individual customer or employee, but also to his or her unique situation.

An augmented workforce powered by AI will help organizations attract and retain new generations of workers

Currently, there are five actions that companies can take to survive and thrive in the new AI-first era:

1. Embrace AI as the new experience layer: Customers won’t just be on apps or the internet. They will expect AI-powered assistants and invisible user interfaces, as well as differentiated experiences such as voice, mixed reality, and haptics.

2. Augment your workers: The gains we’ve made from innovating workplace productivity have hit a plateau, but AI will help organizations reach new levels of efficiency and effectiveness. An augmented workforce powered by AI will also help organizations attract and retain new generations of workers.

3. Plug in to the Platform Economy: Organizations must be ready to create and join the AI-driven borderless platforms in their industry-and others-in order to reach customers where they want to be.

4. Take a DesignOps approach, everywhere: Combining design thinking and modern engineering principles will be necessary to the digital enterprise’s transformation as a completely user-centric entity. Organizations should start now to build up a culture, mindset, and business model ready for a DesignOps revolution-where everyone is focused on the user and value.

5. Act with responsibility and plan for secondary consequences: The rise of AI is fundamentally changing everything about the way we live, work, and understand our world. Organizations must develop a digital ethics framework that addresses issues like data security, trust and privacy, and provides guidelines about how data should be obtained and used.

As companies move down the path to digital transformation, there is a growing need for organizations to act with responsibility and adopt digital ethics as every digital action can have an equal and potentially unintended consequence. The rise of AI is fundamentally changing the way we live, work, and understand our world, and this “digitization of everything” requires a new level of corporate accountability. Just because something can be done with digital innovation doesn’t mean that it should. Each organization must be prepared to continuously assess how smart machines and humans can best work together to drive productivity and innovation. To maintain the trust of employees, partners and customers, investment and focus is required now to address the ethical issues arising from smart machines in the workplace.

Source: it-services.cioreview.com-AI: What it Can Bring and How to Prepare for the Future

How AI Is Changing The Way Companies Are Organized

Artificial Intelligence may still be in its infancy, but it’s already forcing leadership teams around the world to reconsider some of their core structures.

Advances in technology are causing firms to restructure their organizational makeup, transform their HR departments, develop new training models, and reevaluate their hiring practices. This is according to Deloitte’s 2017 Human Capital Trends Report, which draws on surveys from over 10,000 HR and business leaders in 140 countries. Much of these changes are a result of the early penetration of basic AI software, as well as preparation for the organizational needs that will emerge as they mature.

“What we concluded is that what AI is definitely doing is not eliminating jobs, it is eliminating tasks of jobs, and creating new jobs, and the new jobs that are being created are more human jobs,” says Josh Bersin, principal and founder of Bersin by Deloitte. Bersin defines “more human jobs” as those that require traits robots haven’t yet mastered, like empathy, communication, and interdisciplinary problem solving. “Individuals that have very task-oriented jobs will have to be retrained, or they’re going to have to move into new roles,” he adds.

The survey found that 41% of respondents have fully implemented or made significant progress in adopting AI technologies in the workforce, yet only 15% of global executives say they are prepared to manage a workforce “with people, robots, and AI working side by side.”

As a result, early AI technologies and a looming AI revolution are forcing organizations to reevaluate a number of established strategies. Instead of hiring the most qualified person for a specific task, many companies are now putting greater emphasis on cultural fit and adaptability, knowing that individual roles will have to evolve along with the implementation of AI.

On-the-job training has become more vital to transition people into new roles as new technologies are adapted, and HR’s function is quickly moving away from its traditional evaluation and recruiting function—which can increasingly be done more efficiently using big data and AI software—toward a greater focus on improving the employee experience across an increasingly contingent workforce.

The Deloitte survey also found that 56% of respondents are already redesigning their HR programs to leverage digital and mobile tools, and 33% are utilizing some form of AI technology to deliver HR functions.

The integration of early artificial intelligence tools is also causing organizations to become more collaborative and team-oriented, as opposed to the traditional top-down hierarchal structures.

“To integrate AI, you have to have an internal team of expert product people and engineers that know its application and are working very closely with the frontline teams that are actually delivering services,” says Ian Crosby, cofounder and CEO of Bench, a digital bookkeeping provider. “When we are working AI into our frontline service, we don’t go away to a dark room and come back after a year with our masterpiece. We work with our frontline bookkeepers day in, day out.”

In order to properly adapt to changing technologies, organizations are moving away from a top-down structure and toward multidisciplinary teams. In fact, 32% of survey respondents said they are redesigning their organizations to be more team-centric, optimizing them for adaptability and learning in preparation for technological disruption.

Finding a balanced team structure, however, doesn’t happen overnight, explains Crosby. “Very often, if there’s a big organization, it’s better to start with a small team first, and let them evolve and scale up, rather than try to introduce the whole company all at once.”

Crosby adds that Bench’s eagerness to integrate new technologies also impacts the skills the company recruits and hires for. Beyond checking the boxes of the job’s technical requirements, he says the company looks for candidates that are ready to adapt to the changes that are coming.

“When you’re working with AI, you’re building things that nobody has ever built before, and nobody knows how that will look yet,” he says. “If they’re not open to being completely wrong, and having the humility to say they were wrong, we need to reevaluate.”

As AI becomes more sophisticated, leaders will eventually need to decide where to place human employees, which tasks are best suited for machines, and which can be done most efficiently by combining the two.

“It’s a few years before we have actual AI, it’s getting closer and closer, but AI still has a big problem understanding human intent,” says Rurik Bradbury, the global head of research and communication for online chat software provider LivePerson. As more AI software becomes available, he advises organizations to “think of those three different categories—human, machine, or cyborg—and decide who should be hired for this job.”

While AI technologies are still in their infancy, it won’t be long before every organization is forced to develop their own AI strategy in order to stay competitive. Those with the HR teams, training program, organizational structures, and adaptable staff will be best prepared for this fast-approaching reality.

 

Source: Fast Company-How AI Is Changing The Way Companies Are Organized

10 Success Factors for Deploying Software Robots in the Enterprise

The implementation of software robotics and smart technologies frees a workforce from routine tasks while improving efficiencies, data accuracy and compliance.

Make Sure IT Is Involved from the Start

There often is tension between what IT resources a company’s lines of business need to operate most effectively and the allocation of said resources. While the overarching mandates are to improve service and reduce costs, the resources and priorities of the two groups often are misaligned, constraining business growth and performance. Many RPA implementations emanate from business operations teams, leaving IT on the sidelines in favor of speed and creating shadow RPA projects outside of IT’s oversight. This is a mistake. The most successful, scalable deployments of RPA are implemented in full collaboration with IT leadership.

IT Must Demonstrate its Willingness to Collaborate

It also is important for IT and the business teams to work on the same page. IT must recognize the urgent need for RPA in the business in terms of mandates to improve efficiencies, improve customer satisfaction and other drivers and offer appropriate levels of support and partnership to avoid shadow deployments. Collaborating and agreeing on priority deployments upfront will alleviate alignment issues later.

Begin with an Automation Strategy that Sets Direction

One way to align priorities for the business is to work together on setting and aligning expectations with a common vision. Beginning this process with a documented automation strategy is important. What is the target state of RPA within the operations team? What does the roadmap look like? Establish executive sponsorship upfront, agree to the scale of investment and quantify the expected benefits of that investment so it can be measured. Also consider including a proof of concept or pilot project that supports the defined strategy and vision.

Identify Ideal Process Candidates for Automation

For most businesses, the best candidates for automation often are back-office processes wherein the goal is to provide faster, easier service to customers—such as activating a new SIM card in five minutes rather than 24 hours. These processes are mundane and require entering repetitive data into multiple systems that don’t talk to each another. The goal is not to reduce jobs, but to minimize mundane tasks so people can focus on more value-added and fulfilling work.

Don’t Stop with Quick Tactical Wins

You’ve likely identified a large number of existing processes that can be improved with automation. You can move to automate those quickly, secure wins and demonstrate the success of RPA. But RPA presents an opportunity to drive transformational change in your business. Now is the time to take a step back and allow teams to imagine what is possible. Brainstorm with different groups within the business and allow them to be creative in identifying game-changing and high-impact opportunities to create competitive advantage. What would your business do if time, people and resources were unconstrained?

Choose the Right RPA Technology To Enable Process Automation

As business-line and IT leaders work together to choose the right RPA solution, it’s important to understand the difference between simple desktop scripting, software development kits (SDKs) and enterprise RPA. A desktop automation solution offers a quick solution for a team with short, recorded and replay tactical automations aimed at navigating systems on the desktop. Automated tasks, often manually triggered, are coded or recorded individual keystrokes of a user. They are not connected to enterprise systems and are often deployed without the knowledge of IT. SDKs give IT a better, faster way to deliver on business teams’ expectations, but often don’t involve the operations teams in the process.

Make Security a Key Requirement for Vendor Selection

Business and operations leaders should engage IT early on in the process to ensure proper security, infrastructure and support. Enterprise-class RPA should be deployed in the data center or in the cloud, but never on the desktop. If there is a record button on the desktop, IT can’t monitor or provide security or meet regulatory requirements. Desktop deployments should scream “shadow RPA” to the IT organization. It’s important to ensure RPA software meets required compliance requirements such as PCI-DSS, HIPAA and SOX to provide the necessary security and governance.

Find a Strong Implementation Methodology

There are well-defined methodologies that already have been tried and tested for implementing software robots in the enterprise. Make use of these in your environments: 1) Identify the processes that are best-suited to robotic process automation; 2) Establish the benefits case for robotic process automation, encouraging organization wide recognition and adoption; 3) Implement the required infrastructure, governance and support framework to enable a robotic process automation capability to run efficiently and effectively; 4) Define a best-practice approach for process configuration, which increases the potential for automation and accelerates the development life cycle; and 5) Provide the necessary skills to operational resources via a role-based training and mentoring accreditation program.

Welcome ‘Bots’ to Workforce with Change-Management Best Practices

Both IT and business operations should incorporate change management best practices when introducing software robots as part of the workforce to bring teams along with the vision. Introducing bots into the workforce is new and different, and it requires careful concept selling and implementation. Sharing the company’s vision for how the software robots will add value and improve the business is important, but it’s equally important to help employees understand what’s in it for them: How will these robots help them do their jobs better and more efficiently?

Measure Impact to Demonstrate Value

When helping teams understand the total value of RPA, calculate expected benefits across shareholders, customers and employees. Focusing on one area only will sell the initiative short and miss an opportunity for driving broader enterprise value and scale. Use your RPA software to collect meaningful business intelligence data and real-time operational analytics to report on decisions and actions taken by each software robot. Use this data to see how the organization is performing, where process improvements can be made and what new opportunities for revenue and customer satisfaction can be identified.

Source: eweek.com-10 Success Factors for Deploying Software Robots in the Enterprise

6 business cases where RPA delivers proven value

Today, across the world, many millions of hours of staff in customer services, business support and operations are being consumed with mundane, manual, labour intensive activities. While much of the headline-grabbing may come from the concept of Artificial Intelligence and self-learning systems, the fact is that if these mundane tasks were automated, the benefits would be huge, with staff freed up to focus on higher value activities, improved speed and accuracy and significantly reduce costs.

This white paper looks at the various areas within a business where Robotic Process Automation (RPA) can offer benefits along with some proven real world use cases where RPA has already delivered game-changing results for some of our customers.

If you’ve ever asked yourself or others the question “why isn’t that automated?” then it’s highly likely RPA can help you.

Download the Thoughtonomy_RPA_whitepaper to learn more

Source: thoughtonomy.com- 6 business cases where RPA delivers proven value

A look to the future with Professor Leslie Willcocks: RPA and the changing world of work

With 2017 fast approaching, a glance at the future seems only appropriate. In our exclusive interview with Professor Willcocks we look ahead in two areas: the future of utilising RPA (Robotic Process Automation) and its implications to the market at large.

Past November Digital Workforce organized a unique breakfast seminar discussing the role of RPA in digital strategy and excitedly welcomed the event’s keynote speaker, Professor Willcocks. Leslie Willcocks, a professor of London School of Economics, is considered one of the world’s most respected researchers, speakers and business publications writers in the field of knowledge work automation. Following the seminar, Professor Willcocks sat down in private to answer some of our questions.

The larger value of RPA is tied to business processes and institutionalization of the technology. How do organizations reach these benefits as they move forward with RPA?

“One of our researched organizations had an interesting model they worked with, that in my opinion could well be worth coping elsewhere. The company had identified eight key in-house competences which they combined with client assets to form a third entity – a service delivery vehicle. One of the organization’s key competences was process re-engineering, an area in which Robotic Process Automation falls perfectly.

RPA isn’t a technology in a vacuum. It has to sit with something and it fits process best, but the technology has to sit with people too. This is a late learning, as the early adopters often focused on fixing individual processes; almost like sticking a plaster – though a good one – on a wound. Fixing individual processes offers limited benefits compared to adopting the technology on a strategic scale, but doing so requires willingness to build new capabilities. Luckily we found, that all good process principles, such as Six Sigma and Lean, fit RPA extremely well – these principles demand companies to take a broader look at their business strategy and key performance indicators as well as consider their alignment with the organization’s process technologies and people. New adopters of RPA are doing exactly this.”

Considering future advances, could RPA be utilized to tap into even more opportunities?

“RPA technologies are one small piece of the bigger automation jigsaw. Digitalization should be looked at as a whole. The organizations I know of work with automation centers of excellence. This should be the approach even if RPA is the only tool in the box right now. Things like business analytics and amplifying automation by analyzing unstructured data with solutions such as cognitive intelligence stick on top of what can be done with RPA. Creating a platform compatible for integrating all these solutions should be the obvious next step.”

What kind of impact do you expect RPA will have to the market at large?

“Compared to other robotic technologies RPA faces less issues related to ethical conflicts or underdeveloped regulations. On the contrary, RPA is often used to conform with regulatory requirements. It is however, important that the modern tech area is well regulated. Having regulations in place helps steer the impact of fast moving change while the social implications of growing business efficiency depend on the power and wealth being spread fairly.

Studies suggest jobs being both created and lost as a result of RPA automation. There is also a distinct difference between using a technology as a complementary or replacement solution. The full data is poorly incorporated to most studies. Such flawed publications speak of 47% job loss due automation. Based on our research, 14-16% fewer jobs in the sectors where RPA operates seems realistic. However, the most of the eliminated work load won’t translate to loss of total jobs but partial jobs.

Using the term “robot” seems sometimes unnecessarily bias, when you consider that RPA could just as well be described as a software solution. When describing RPA I often use the line “taking the robot out of the human” as it accurately describes what the technology does. The amount of knowledge work has dramatically increased in every sector from health care to banking. Over the last 10 years of conducting interviews, no one has ever told me that their work load has stayed the same or decreased! This fact has gone largely unnoticed in the public discussion but resulted to a situation where, for all the over-worked individuals, implementing RPA is simply great!”

Source: digitalworkforce.eu -A look to the future with Professor Leslie Willcocks: RPA and the changing world of work

Robotic process automation market expected to grow in healthcare – Health IT Pulse

Robotic process automation (RPA), a software with artificial intelligence and machine learning capabilities that essentially automates other software, has already begun to make its way into the healthcare space and it seems the use of this technology will only continue to grow in healthcare.

AI in healthcare goes beyond IBM Watson. In this e-guide, discover 4 uses for AI in healthcare – particularly how it can help improve patient engagement – and whether we can overcome security and interoperability concerns surrounding the technology.

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The RPA market is projected to reach $8.75 billion by 2024, according to a press release. RPA is already beginning to take hold in healthcare especially when it comes to processing claims and automating administrative tasks.

One health IT expert discussed the potential use cases for RPA in healthcare with SearchHealthIT. He said the main use case he sees for RPA in healthcare is when it comes to revenue cycle management and he believes RPA can provide comparative looks at medical records — analysis of the differences in medical records and analysis of what those differences are — as well.

The expert also said that RPA can be helpful in healthcare when it comes to keeping up with the licensure and certification of clinicians and ensuring they are up to date.

In addition to healthcare, the financial industry, and telecom/IT industries are all embracing this technology as well. The release said this is because these industries all handle large volumes of data entry and switching among various applications.

“Healthcare accounted for over 11% market share in 2015,” the release said. “RPA solutions are increasingly adopted in the healthcare industry as the sector requires labor-intensive activities and demands on patient rules along with ever increasing amount of data processing.”

One key player when it comes to RPA is Blue Prism, the release said. And Blue Prism has already made its way into the healthcare space.

Source: searchhealthit.techtarget.com-Robotic process automation market expected to grow in healthcare

Most people are optimistic about workplace automation

There’s lots of prognosticating about what impact robotics and automation will have on the future of work — with mostly dystopian depictions predicting displaced workers and increasing unemployment. But new social data from Adobe Digital Insights suggests that the average worker is far less cynical when it comes to welcoming robots into the workplace.

According to Adobe, most people are talking (on social media) about how robots are helping their work, not taking it away. Workers are also upbeat about being able to hand over mundane tasks to robots so human workers can do more meaningful jobs. Machine learning, artificial intelligence, and robots were the most discussed FOW topics.

Adobe’s report is based on roughly 3 million social mentions captured from Twitter, news, blogs, and forums between January 2016 and January 2017. Interestingly, the FOW hashtag was mentioned twice as many times on Twitter than on workplace-focused LinkedIn.

Across social media, Future of Work (FOW) mentions are up 40 percent year over year, automation mentions have doubled year over year and average daily mentions of robots and jobs have increased 70 percent year over year.

“Overall, people seem to believe the FOW is promising, particularly when it comes to the automation of traditionally mundane tasks,” wrote Joe Martin, head of social insights for Adobe, in a blog post. “Automating document and signature processes, for example, could open up new possibilities for people as the tech revolution advances. Work environments should continue to improve as employees demand more from their space.”

Source: Most people are optimistic about workplace automation

Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto