How cognitive computing is changing IoT

Cognitive computing means giving computers the ability to work out complex problems for themselves. Just like humans, cognitive computers benefit greatly from experience, learning better ways to solve problems with each encounter. When a traditional system of rules finds a task impossible, cognitive computing sees only an opportunity to expand its knowledge.

The necessity for cognitive computing in the Internet of Things (IoT) arises from the importance of data in modern business. In the smart IoT venues of the future, everyone from startups to enterprises to homeowners will use data to make decisions using facts rather than instincts. Cognitive computing uses data and responds to changes within it to make better decisions on the basis of specific learning from past experiences, compared with a rule-based decision system.

How we define that data is changing, though. Soon, data itself will require this level of computing to extract, making this new method even more valuable to the development of the IoT.

Cognitive computing implications for IoT

While we are still a long way from talking to our operating systems like they’re our friends, cognitive computing has some immediate applications in the IoT that will allow businesses to use their devices to their fullest potentials.

Consider cognitive computing from a perspective of its immediate return on investment. While no computing system is close to true artificial intelligence yet, breaking up the duties of the cognitive machine into smaller tasks allows it to perform cognitive duties in specific fields with great success. Through bite-sized chunks of cognitive computing such as planning, forecasting, reasoning, and recognizing information such as text and images, companies can incorporate cognitive computing into their existing IoT and immediately reap the benefits.

The banking industry already has several uses for cognitive computing in the IoT,specifically in fraud detection. Previously, detecting fraud relied on rules-based analysis. Is the card being used in another state? Is the card being used for a foreign transaction at an odd hour? With cognitive computing, those rules become small parts of a more comprehensive whole, allowing banks to learn consumers’ spending habits, project the likelihoods of future purchases, and put a freeze on a card if the usage pattern indicates the card is being used fraudulently.

As cognitive computing and the IoT grow together, businesses big and small will benefit from the autonomous capabilities of the new technologies.

Improving productivity through technology

In the near future, an IoT powered by cognitive computing will lead a revolution in increased productivity. As more autonomous systems enter the IoT, businesses will need to learn new skills to take advantage of the expanded potential.

Cognitive computing’s ability to forecast more accurately means businesses must become more familiar with anticipatory and predictive systems. As the communication abilities of the technology become more robust, users will need to learn how to respond to and interact with the devices’ queries. Businesses will need to train decision makers in interpreting the advanced data models that cognitive computers can produce in order to reap the full benefits of the technology.

Eventually, cognitive computing in the IoT will lead to products that can make instant, autonomous business decisions without human intervention. From customer interaction to manufacturing and maintenance of equipment, processes that once required guesswork and reactive management will have fact-based, proactive solutions.

The future of data and cognitive computing

Right now, companies don’t have the talent they need to realize the full potential of all the data they measure. Cognitive computing in the IoT will allow data-collection and data-interpreting machines to communicate with one another quickly and completely, opening the door for a surge of new business strategies.

Thankfully, the early generations of these products are already here. Google’s DeepMind is the most visible example, replicating some basic functions of human thought with faster processing speeds to deliver actionable answers to data-based questions. As devices like these become more advanced and more prominent in the business world, companies will be able to test the limits of their application to the extreme, putting data and smart computing to work in ways that will change the landscape of modern business as we know it.

The real benefits in the world of millions of devices and sensors connected in an IoT world comes from having a learning engine closer to each sensor, displacing any existing rules. This way, decision-making becomes individual and specific to the sensor or node and purely based on its own experience. For example, in the case of healthcare, health trends and past learning for a specific person is used against a fixed threshold in decision-making. The same idea can be applied across other industries as well.

And because all those devices and sensors are interconnected, their exchange of information and collective learning can offset the significant data and the time required for learning while also preparing for the dynamic needs of the solution. For example, a particular node exposed to a cyberattack can pass this learning over the network on the fly, which will help in safeguarding the rest of the nodes.

Cognitive computing in the IoT presents as many challenges as it solves, but the challenges will be the kind that businesses want. Rather than worry that they don’t have the talent or resources to collect, read, and act upon their data, companies will soon wonder what to do with the bounty of information and analytics at their fingertips. Luckily, cognitive computing power will be there to help them along the way.

Source: readwrite.com-How cognitive computing is changing IoT

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IoT to play a part in more than a quarter of cyber attacks by 2020, says Gartner

More than 25% of cyber attacks will involve the internet of things (IoT) by 2020, according to technology research firm Gartner.

And yet, researchers claimed IoT would account for less than 10% of IT security budgets and, as a result, security suppliers would have little incentive to provide usable IoT security features.

They also said the decentralised approach to early IoT implementations in organisations would result in too little focus on security.

Suppliers will focus too much on spotting vulnerabilities and exploits, rather than segmentation and other long-term means that better protect IoT, according to Gartner.

“The effort of securing IoT is expected to focus more and more on the management, analytics and provisioning of devices and their data,” said Gartnerresearch director Ruggero Contu.

“IoT business scenarios will require a delivery mechanism that can also grow and keep pace with requirements in monitoring, detection, access control and other security needs,” he added.

According to Contu, the future of cloud-based security services is, in part, linked with the future of the IoT.

“The IoT’s fundamental strength in scale and presence will not be fully realised without cloud-based security services to deliver an acceptable level of operation for many organisations in a cost-effective manner,” he said.

Gartner predicted that by 2020, at least half of all IoT implementations would use some form of cloud-based security service.

Read more about IoT security

Although overall spending will initially be moderate, Gartner predicted that IoT security market spending would increase at a faster rate after 2020, as improved skills, organisational change and more scalable service options improved execution.

Gartner predicted global spending on IoT security would reach $348m in 2016 – just 23.7% up compared with 2015 – $433.95m in 2017 and $547m in 2018.

“The market for IoT security products is currently small, but it is growing as both consumers and businesses start using connected devices in ever greater numbers,” said Contu.

“Gartner forecasts that 6.4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide in 2016, up by 30% from 2015, and will reach 11.4 billion units by 2018. However, considerable variation exists among different industry sectors as a result of different levels of prioritisation and security awareness,” he said.

Source: computerweekly.com – IoT to play a part in more than a quarter of cyber attacks by 2020

The importance of thoughtful customer support in the age of IoT | The Enterprisers Project

If you think customer support is tough now, just wait until consumers get their hands on more of those Internet of Things (IoT)-equipped goodies.

Michael Ringman, CIO of TELUS International, a 21,000 employee global unit of Canadian telecommunications services provider TELUS Corp., envisions an increasingly complex customer care environment as consumers connect growing numbers of IP-enabled devices in the home.

Gartner projects four billion consumer IoT devices will be in use in 2016, growing to 13.5 billion in 2020, far outpacing business IoT devices. But who are you going to call when something in that connected world isn’t working right?

Ringman provides a real-world example: “Recently I purchased a Logitech remote control to control a bunch of my home devices. It’s got its own Wi-Fi hotspot enabled, so I can control my thermostat, even my LED lights potentially, and all of these other features I wasn’t necessarily aware of. If I want to control my thermostat and it isn’t working, do I call Logitech, do I call my home DSL provider, do I call the product manufacturer for that thermostat?”

IoT opportunities … and challenges

Ringman’s organization provides contact center outsourcing and business process outsourcing services, primarily to business-to-consumer (B2C) companies. As such, the consumer IoT-connected world represents opportunities and challenges.

“I see it as a great opportunity, a great catalyst for growth, because the standards aren’t necessarily 100 percent defined on how those communications are supposed to work,” he says. “There will be be a lot of IP-connected devices in that environment, and consumers all want to be able to use it easily and effectively, so how do you provide great customer support around that? The contact center now, rather than being able to answer generic, basic questions, like ‘how do I turn on my Internet connection?,’ suddenly has to evolve to answer more difficult and deeper questions,” he explains.

At TELUS International, the internal IT team is closely engaged with making its contact center and outsourcing services a competitive differentiator for the business. In addition, IT is a revenue center, providing IT outsourcing services to external clients. Over the past decade, Ringman’s organization has absorbed contact center companies in the Philippines, Central America and eastern Europe, building private cloud-based services for internal clients, and public cloud-hosted services for external customers.

“As we’ve consolidated and adapted to move at the speed of business, we’ve made decisions to leverage the cloud internally, so our critical IT resources can truly focus on what helps differentiate us in industry, in the eyes of our customers” he says.

Consolidation of services silos

Meeting growing expectations will require consolidation of typical customer support and services silos, such as customer relationship management, e-commerce, mobile apps and so forth, says Ringman. “The retail storefront technology and in-store support, for example, is usually very separate from what you do on the contact center side, which is very separate from what you’re doing in most organizations from your mobile and web interface.”

But at many enterprises, customer service is not at the forefront of strategic thinking, he says. “At the C-suite level, they can tell you in detail what it takes to get their particular product to market and up to speed, but what they often can’t tell you about is what their customers are doing,” Ringman says. “Our view is that great customer service doesn’t start with the customer service arm, it starts at the top.”

He believes enterprise thinking in this area is changing, though, adding that just as a business wouldn’t settle for a sub-standard system for its financial reporting, they’re now increasingly recognizing the importance of investing in customer service. “If a company is truly thoughtful and driven around how they want to provide customer support, they can help guide that end user to the appropriate sources,” Ringman says. And as the IoT increases the complexity of supporting consumers, that thoughtfulness is essential.

Source: enterprisersproject.com-The importance of thoughtful customer support in the age of IoT | The Enterprisers Project

IBM Opens Watson IoT Global Headquarters, Extends Power of Cognitive Computing to a Connected World

IBM announced the opening of its global headquarters for Watson Internet of Things (IoT), launching a series of new offerings, capabilities and ecosystem partners designed to extend the power of cognitive computing to the billions of connected devices, sensors and systems that comprise the IoT. These new offerings will be available through the IBM Watson IoT Cloud, the company’s global platform for IoT business and developers.

As part of today’s launch, the company announced that Munich, Germany will serve as the global headquarters for its new Watson IoT unit, as well as its first European Watson innovation center. The campus environment will bring together 1000 IBM developers, consultants, researchers and designers to drive deeper engagement with clients and partners, and will also serve as an innovation lab for data scientists, engineers and programmers building a new class of connected solutions at the intersection of cognitive computing and the IoT. The center will drive collaborative innovation with clients, partners and IBM researchers and data scientists to create new opportunities for growth in IoT. It represents IBM’s largest investment in Europe in more than two decades.

IBM also will deliver Watson APIs and services on the Watson IoT Cloud Platform to accelerate the development of cognitive IoT solutions and services, helping clients and partners make sense of the growing volume and variety of data in a physical world that is rapidly becoming digitized.

With these moves, clients, start-ups, academia and a robust ecosystem of IoT partners –from silicon and device manufacturers to industry-oriented solution providers –will have direct access to IBM’s open, cloud-based IoT platform to test, develop and create the next generation cognitive IoT apps, services and solutions. Leading automotive, electronics, healthcare, insurance and industrial manufacturers that are at the forefront of the region’s Industry 4.0 efforts are among those most expected to benefit.

“The Internet of Things will soon be the largest single source of data on the planet, yet almost 90 percent of that data is never acted upon,” said Harriet Green, general manager, Watson IoT and Education. “With its unique abilities to sense, reason and learn, Watson opens the door for enterprises, governments and individuals to finally harness this real-time data, compare it with historical data sets and deep reservoirs of accumulated knowledge, and then find unexpected correlations that generate new insights to benefit business and society alike.”

The company also announced that it has opened eight new Watson IoT Client Experience Centers across Asia, Europe and the Americas. Locations include Beijing, China; Boeblingen, Germany; Sao Paulo, Brazil; Seoul, Korea; Tokyo, Japan; and Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Texas in United States. These centers provide clients and partners access to technology, tools and talent needed to develop and create new products and services using cognitive intelligence delivered through the Watson IoT Cloud Platform.

Siemens Building Technologies, the market leader in safe, energy-efficient and environmentally friendly buildings and infrastructures, announced that it is teaming with IBM to bring innovation to the digitalization of buildings. Siemens is working to bring advanced analytics capabilities together with IBM’s IoT solutions to advance their Navigator platform for energy management and sustainability.

“By bringing asset management and analytics together with a deep technical understanding of how buildings perform, Siemens will make customers’ building operations more reliable, cost-optimized and sustainable,” said Matthias Rebellius, CEO of Siemens Building Technologies. “We are excited to stretch the envelope of what is possible in optimizing building performance by combining the asset management and database technologies from IBM’s Watson IoT business unit with our market leading building automation domain know-how.”

New Watson IoT Services Accelerate Cognitive IoT

IBM is bringing the power of cognitive analytics to the IoT by making four families of Watson API services available as part of a new IBM Watson IoT Analytics offering. As the physical world of devices and systems are becoming highly digitized, these capabilities will allow clients, partners and developers to make greater sense of this data through machine learning and correlation with unstructured data.

The four new API services include:

The Natural Language Processing (NLP) API Family enables users to interact with systems and devices using simple, human language. Natural Language Processing helps solutions understand the intent of human language by correlating it with other sources of data to put it into context in specific situations. For example, a technician working on a machine might notice an unusual vibration. He can ask the system “What is causing that vibration?” Using NLP and other sensor data, the system will automatically link words to meaning and intent, determine the machine he is referencing, and correlate recent maintenance to identify the most likely source of the vibration and then recommend an action to reduce it.

The Machine Learning Watson API Family automates data processing and continuously monitors new data and user interactions to rank data and results based on learned priorities. Machine Learning can be applied to any data coming from devices and sensors to automatically understand the current conditions, what’s normal, expected trends, properties to monitor, and suggested actions when an issue arises. For example, the platform can monitor incoming data from fleet equipment to learn both normal and abnormal conditions, including environment and production processes, which are often unique to each piece of equipment. Machine Learning helps understand these differences and configures the system to monitor the unique conditions of each asset.

The Video and Image Analytics API Family enables monitoring of unstructured data from video feeds and image snapshots to identify scenes and patterns. This knowledge can be combined with machine data to gain a greater understanding of past events and emerging situations. For example, video analytics monitoring security cameras might note the presence of a forklift infringing on a restricted area, creating a minor alert in the system; three days later, an asset in that area begins to exhibit decreased performance. The two incidents can be correlated to identify a collision between the forklift and asset that might not have been readily apparent from the video or the data from the machine.

The Text Analytics API Family enables mining of unstructured textual data including transcripts from customer call centers, maintenance technician logs, blog comments, and tweets to find correlations and patterns in these vast amounts of data. For example, phrases reported through unstructured channels — such as “my brakes make a noise”, ”my car seems to slow to stop,” and “the pedal feels mushy” — can be linked and correlated to identify potential field issues in a particular make and model of car.

The Intersection of Cognitive and Internet of Things

Cognitive computing represents a new class of systems that learn at scale, reason with purpose and interact with humans naturally. Rather than being explicitly programmed, they learn and reason from their interactions with us and from their experiences with their environment, enabling them to keep pace with the volume, complexity, and unpredictability of information generated by the IoT. Cognitive systems can make sense of the 80 percent of the world’s data that computer scientists call “unstructured,” which means they can illuminate aspects of the world that were previously invisible, allowing users to gain greater insight and to make more informed decisions.

Source: IBM-IBM Opens Watson IoT Global Headquarters, Extends Power of Cognitive Computing to a Connected World

IoT Outlook 2015 Report

Applications and use cases for the Internet of Things (IoT) extend into almost every major industry vertical, and is already being exploited to great benefit by enterprise firms the world over, most notably in industrial, automotive, and manufacturing industries.

Telecoms Intelligence recently ran a comprehensive survey to gain a more thorough understanding of the IoT opportunity for operators today. Just short of 1,000 respondents participated in the questionnaire, covering four comprehensive areas of concern: Information security, networking challenges, cloud and big data, and industrial IoT.

Download the Report at: IoT Outlook 2015 Report

IoT considerations for CIOs

Gartner has predicted that by 2020 the Internet of Thingswill grow to 26 billion objects. (This excludes smartphones, tablets and PCs, which will account for a separate 7.3 billion devices, Gartner adds.) With these kinds of staggering numbers, there is a disruption in the making — and we CIOs need to be ready for it.

What are the “things” that we should be prepared for? At one level, all sorts of familiar “dumb” devices — the toaster, light bulb, refrigerator, faucet — will be ‘smartened’ with real-time sensors responding to internal or external data, and will be able to communicate.

Even more exciting are a class of totally new things — clothes with embedded sensors, earphones that measure heart rate and temperature, smart watches that look for presence — creating ripples of data around both inanimate and animate objects. In the future it will be tough to have a heart attack in private, or even to lose a dog.

As the IoT explodes with sensor costs coming down and capability going up, one should expect, at least initially, a fair amount of heterogeneity. There will be sensors that read and transmit, but cannot be controlled. But in some cases there will be truer bi-directional control. There will be different mechanisms for communication between certain clusters and classes of things — think RFIDs: very different from how, say, a network of servers communicates, or how kitchen devices might poll each other to compute a shopping list for you.

Standards will undoubtedly evolve, but these are likely to be sets of standards for particular verticals like medical devices or the automotive industry. IP-addressable sensors and sets of sensors will make the “internet of the physical world” happen.

But what will IoT be for? At the consumer level, we are headed towards hyper-awareness at multiple levels: Personal health statistics, environment optimization, social presence relay and detection, behavioral prediction (like personal spend preferences and triggers) and the like.

At the business level there will be two imperatives. For those manufacturing physical goods, there will be the pressure for “smart everything” — what should be measured and why, how the data should be used and when, and how such sensors can be made virtually invisible.

The second imperative, and this will be for all: How can IoT data be used to understand and optimize business processes, tools, communications and buying and selling behavior?

Ultimately the game is one of competitive advantage, and using IoT to advantage will be a key skill required of CIOs.

For CIOs, the biggest challenges will be the quantity, collection, analysis and purposeful utilization of near-real-time or real-time data from numerous heterogeneous sources. Big Data has emerged at just the right time for this. But the harvesting of data from inexpensive sensors — many of which will fail, be in error, need recalibration in different environments or may not have been activated — will require intelligent handling of large data volumes.

Even without reference to IoT, SanDisk, as an example, is predicting a 14-fold increase in enterprise data to be managed by 2020. IoT multiplies this challenge.

For companies looking to make an impact In the IT world, there are clear and open frontiers to a wide array of both simple and complex sensors to detect and correct device failures for IoT, or better still prevent them. There are obvious needs for large volumes of sensor data to get to the right place securely for analysis and optimizing of objectives.

Accompanying this are concerns about privacy, security and theft, especially since many of the ‘things’ entering a business may be from multiple unknown consumer sources. (If you thought BYOD was tough on CIOs, wait until your employee’s shirt wants to adjust the thermostat!).

At a more mundane level, as machines communicate with software, today’s concerns about user experience will be replaced with concerns about efficiency and effectiveness of the back-end. New licensing models are also likely to evolve — clusters of machine interactions differ significantly from users interacting with software. The cloud will play a big part in machine interactions, particularly for transmission, storage and analysis, since local read/transmit or read/act/transmit will be the most common states.

We have highlighted heterogeneity as pervasive, at least at the start of the Internet of Things. This does not mean that “seamless integration” will not be expected of the CIO! Personal, home and work environments will be expected to connect in rich ways without interruption. APIs and extensions from the sensor manufacturers, communications standards and protocols will all help. But the work ahead is fairly formidable.

With all of the above, how does the role of the CIO and IT change? I have a fundamental belief that I will re-state here: “If you treat IT as a commodity that is what you will get. If you treat it as the creative edge of your business, you have a weapon like no other.”

Nowhere will this be truer than in how different companies approach IoT. The laggards will view IoT as an infrastructure issue: Get things talking, collect data, send it off for data warehousing and analysis. The leading IT departments will embrace IoT as a green-field for partnership with the business to explore how new business models and predictive customer knowledge can evolve.

Source: Computerworld-IoT considerations for CIOs by Azmi Jafarey

Security, Privacy Rank Among the Top IoT Concerns: CompuCom

A new survey reveals that IT professionals are apprehensive about security and data privacy as the Internet of Things continues to expand

s the Internet of Things (IoT) shaping up to become a security nightmare?

The fast-growing market for IoT solutions and services may be giving IT professionals some pause, suggests a new study from Dallas-based IT outsourcing company CompuCom. Citing a forecast from IDC, the firm expects the IoT market to consist of 212 billion connected devices and be worth $8.9 trillion in 2020. Meanwhile, telecommunications giant Verizon predicts that by the same year, the industry will have established 5.4 billion business-to-business (B2B) IoT connections.

With so many devices flooding the Internet of Things with so much data, it’s little wonder that IT experts are a little wary.

A recent survey of 431 technology professionals conducted by CompuCom found that security and the potential rise in cyberattacks were the top concern for 44 percent of respondents. Data privacy and the risk of exposure of sensitive personal information emerged as a major worry for 28 percent of those polled.

“IT professionals have pretty much figured out security at the traditional end-point,” remarked Sam Gross, chief technology officer for CompuCom. “IoT accentuates a new set of security concerns that span securing the device, the edge network and the new classes of data that will be collected.”

Current approaches to safeguarding data and locking down networks may fall short in the IoT era, he added. “How we rethink security standards has driven innovation into the marketplace that will benefit us all.”

Some IT pros fear that their companies may be dragging their feet on the way to IoT readiness, the survey revealed. Nine percent pointed to a lack of organizational drive in committing to, or investing in, IoT-enabled technologies. Five percent of respondents expressed unease about finding ways to capitalize on IoT data.

Another five percent are worried that consumers may push back against IoT, fearing the possibility of invasive surveillance and other “Big Brother” scenarios. Technology and interoperability issues represent a big stumbling block for yet another five percent of survey takers.

Finally, as always, someone has to pay the bill. Four percent of respondents said implementation costs were giving them doubts about IoT.

At least one tech giant doesn’t look like it needs much convincing.

IBM on Tuesday announced a major bet on IoT, to the tune of $3 billion over the next four years. Some of that funding will go toward advancing Big Blue’s analytics capabilities, ultimately helping customers benefit from the business-enhancing insights that are locked away in mountains of IoT data.

Source: Security, Privacy Rank Among the Top IoT Concerns: CompuCom

Gartner: CIOs boost spending on sci-fi technologies

CIOs in the UK and Ireland are expected to increase their spending by 1.4% in 2015, fuelled by the economic recovery, according to research company Gartner.

Technologies related to the internet of things (IoT), robotics and 3D printing are among the big areas of investment.

Gartner’s research found that 10% of CIOshave already deployed IoT.

“A lot of science fiction is becoming real investment, such as 3D printing,” said Gartner analyst Lee Weldon.

Gartner estimated that 5% of CIOs have already deployed 3D printing, while 9% of UK and Irish CIOs are implementing new forms of robotics. This is higher than the global average.

In 2015, the technologies attracting the highest level of investments will be analytics and cloud computing. According to Weldon, of the CIOs who said their organisations were developing new software, 21% were considering hosting these in the cloud as their first choice.

“After years of cost-cutting, strategic investment in information and technology is returning,” said Weldon.

He said companies are looking to drive business growth in new areas, pointing to widespread interest in technology trends such as cloud, mobility, IoT and digitisation.

CEOs recognise that growth often comes through technology innovation, according to Gartner’s research. “There is more investment from the business in technology,” said Weldon.

This year, spending on digital technology moved up three places to third priority, behind analytics and cloud but ahead of datacentre and infrastructure spending.

Gartner urged CIOs to spend the majority of their time working with areas of the business outside IT to ensure that the value of information and technology is understood and the right investments are made.

In 2015, leading CIOs will spend less than 40% of their time running the IT organisation, choosing instead to spend time with other CxOs (27% of their time), business unit leaders (18% of their time) and external customers (16% of their time).

Source: Computerweekly.com Gartner: CIOs boost spending on sci-fi technologies by Cliff Saran

Gartner: CIOs boost spending on sci-fi technologies

CIOs in the UK and Ireland are expected to increase their spending by 1.4% in 2015, fuelled by the economic recovery, according to research company Gartner.

Technologies related to the internet of things (IoT), robotics and 3D printing are among the big areas of investment.
Gartner’s research found that 10% of CIOs have already deployed IoT.

“A lot of science fiction is becoming real investment, such as 3D printing,” said Gartner analyst Lee Weldon.

Gartner estimated that 5% of CIOs have already deployed 3D printing, while 9% of UK and Irish CIOs are implementing new forms of robotics. This is higher than the global average.

In 2015, the technologies attracting the highest level of investments will be analytics and cloud computing. According to Weldon, of the CIOs who said their organisations were developing new software, 21% were considering hosting these in the cloud as their first choice.

“After years of cost-cutting, strategic investment in information and technology is returning,” said Weldon.

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He said companies are looking to drive business growth in new areas, pointing to widespread interest in technology trends such as cloud, mobility, IoT and digitisation.

CEOs recognise that growth often comes through technology innovation, according to Gartner’s research. “There is more investment from the business in technology,” said Weldon.

This year, spending on digital technology moved up three places to third priority, behind analytics and cloud but ahead of datacentre and infrastructure spending.

Gartner urged CIOs to spend the majority of their time working with areas of the business outside IT to ensure that the value of information and technology is understood and the right investments are made.

In 2015, leading CIOs will spend less than 40% of their time running the IT organisation, choosing instead to spend time with other CxOs (27% of their time), business unit leaders (18% of their time) and external customers (16% of their time).

Surce: Computerweekly-Gartner: CIOs boost spending on sci-fi technologies by Cliff Saran

IoT services will impact the wireless network in 2015

IoT services will become more widespread in 2015 and enterprises will need to ensure their Wi-Fi networks are up for the challenge.

The ability to connect everyday objects and devices to the enterprise network is becoming a requirement for many businesses, and the wireless network will play a large role in determining how successful the rollout of the Internet of Things and associated services will be.

As Internet of Things (IoT) services are pushed out to more people and endpoints — which could be located in remote areas or subject to harsh environmental conditions — enterprises must ensure their wireless LANs are bolstered with specialized networking equipment capable of handling the additional number of clients sending and receiving data. While there are different ways of deploying IoT services — such as working with vendor, service providers or creating homegrown applications — the wireless network will provide the plumbing that the IoT will need to be successful

 

Read more at: IoT services will impact the wireless network in 2015 by Gina Narcisi